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Posts Tagged ‘Kirkland dog food’

 

Like every dog owner, I wrestle with conflicting and confusing information about canine nutrition and dog food ingredients. I want the best for Brownie but can’t afford the highest-priced dog foods. Recently, I obtained¬†a sample of Burns Brown Rice and Chicken Meal dry dog food. It advertises its products as “holistic – working with Nature to promote pet health.” It has a warehouse and offices right in Valparaiso, which appealed to my go-local desire (although I don’t know where it’s actually made).

Before feeding any to Brownie, I looked up some of the ingredients and stumbled across the website Dog Food Advisor (http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/). It gives Burns three out of five stars for quality, concludes that it is “recommended” but raised questions about the relatively low amounts of protein and fats in the Burns formula. It’s also pricey, costing $45 for a 33-lb bag.

The same site gave Costco’s in-house brand, Kirkland, an above-average rating of four stars. A 40-lb bag of this goes for roughly $25. A higher rating and lower cost made this choice sound like a no-brainer until I read somewhere else that Kirkland buys its dog food from Diamond. The Dog Food Advisor gives Diamond only a below-average two-star rating.

To complicate matters further, I have been feeding Brownie Iams on the recommendation of another pet owner after I complained that Brownie had developed a persistent, unpleasant odor. The odor disappeared after she’d been eating Iams for a while. But Dog Food Advisor gives it only two stars, a below-average rating.

So now what? I’ve decided to give the Kirkland food a try. It costs less and has a higher rating than Iams or Burns, although there is some question about the rating based on whether it’s really the lower-rated Diamond dog food packaged under the Kirkland name. If Brownie’s body odor returns, I’ll be back in my usual pet-food quandry. Stay turned for updates.

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